Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 3

Alright lets continue with our stock Raspberry Pi – Jessie build. It’s a long post, hang on to the handle bars!

First, install mdadm using the following commands:

sudo apt-get update #Updates our repository list
sudo apt-get install mdadm #
Accept the prompt during the installation.

Second, we’ll assume the disks are intended for a built from scratch RAID 5 array, so we’ll destroy all data on the disk (technically all we’re doing is remove previous partition table and formatting information, it could still be recovered  with data recovery software, many available on the Internet).

We’ll also assume 3 disks. More can be used, but not less than 3 for a RAID 5 array, that’s a requirement. In my case I have 3 powered external USB disks directly plugged in to the Pi.

Third, identify the disks using lsblk -o NAME,SIZE,FSTYPE,TYPE,MOUNTPOINT 

lsblk

Here are my three disks, sda1, sdb1 and sdc1 (a through c denoting the sequence of the disks). My disks are partitioned already in the above picture (we’ll talk about that below) so they have numeric sequencing for their disks (the number 1 as all use the first partition). If they never partitioned then you’ll see sda, sdb, sdc and need to partition them before use.

Be very careful and verify that the disks identified are indeed disks that you intend to use! Once we proceed all previous data will be erased!

Fourth, we’ll start by partioning them using the command sudo parted. Once launched you’ll see a prompt with (parted). We’ll enter the following commands at this prompt. Start creating the partitions.

select /dev/sda
mklabel gpt
mkpart primary ext4 1049KB 3TB

select /dev/sda selects the first disk to be partitioned.
mklabel creates a partition table of type gpt (specifically needed for Linux and large multi Terabyte disks).
mkpart creates the partition. In this case I am starting at 1049KB (never mind the reasoning …) and ending at 3TB as that is the size of the disks I have (a 3TB external USB drive).

Proceed to the other disks (sdb and sdc replacing sda) the same way.
Enter quit to exit out of parted.

Fifth, we create the RAID 5 array using the following commands. This will prevent from the array created with spares (which we don’t want, we want to use all the disks for the maximum capacity we can get, we’re already losing 1/3 of the total disk space for parity information).

sudo mdadm –create –verbose –force –assume-clean /dev/md0 –level=5 \
–raid-devices=3 /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1

Check that they’re running with the following command

cat /proc/mdstat

You should see:

mdstat

Lets create the filesystem (this is what most resembles the Format command in Windows).

sudo mkfs.ext4 -F /dev/md0

You should see:

mkfs

It is now ready to mount so we can access it

sudo mkdir -p /mnt/raid5

You can now mount it using

sudo mount /dev/md0 /mnt/raid5

and see it’s content by

ls -al /mnt/raid5

mount

You can also confirm its capacity by (note /dev/md0 with 5.5T of size).

df -h -x devtmpfs -x tmpfs

mount

We’ll save the configuration in /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf so it starts up at boot time automatically.

sudo mdadm –detail –scan | sudo tee -a /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf

Update the initial file system (Raspberry Pi uses a RAM disk image when booting up and we want to include our array).

sudo update-initramfs -u

We’ll add the drive array to our filesystem table also so it will be mounted automatically when booting up.

echo ‘/dev/md0 /mnt/raid5 ext4 defaults,nofail,discard 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab

Finally confirm the array gets mounted by rebooting the Pi.

sudo reboot

You should see the following when it has booted.

ls

If “lost+found” entry isn’t listed there is more work to do (which I had to do with my Pi).

Edit /etc/rc.local file

sudo pico /etc/rc.local

Add the following line right before the line containing “exit 0”

/usr/local/bin/raid5 &

Then we create a shell script at /usr/local/bin/raid5

sudo pico /usr/local/bin/raid5

Enter the following lines in it

#!/bin/bash
# Sleep for 20 seconds after boot to make all the disks available for array assembly
sleep 20
sudo mdadm –assemble –scan # Assemble the RAID 5 array

Then set the execute permissions for the file

sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/raid5

Now reboot and the raid array should mount automatically. If it still doesn’t then add the following to /usr/local/bin/raid5

mount -a

Once mounted run the following command so I can start populating the /mnt/raid5 folder.

sudo chmod ug+wrx /mnt/raid5

That’s it!

Next I’ll setup samba (SMB Windows shares for Linux) and share out the folder so I can connect to it from other machines …

Next move on to part 4, the end of the journey: https://caesarsamsi.wordpress.com/2017/01/03/raspberry-pi-2b-raid-5-build-part-4/

Advertisements

One thought on “Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 3

  1. Pingback: Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 2 | Caesar Samsi

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s